A Word About White Supremacy

Grupo feminista - Spain

Grupo feminista – Spain

“How I survived as the only woman in business school” in the Financial Times on September 1, 2017 is an interview with emeritus Professor of International Accounting, Jöelle Le Vourc’h. It’s a story I really resonated with!

Professor Le Vurc’h’s interviewer, Emma Jacobs, tells us that in 1970, “Jöelle Le Vourc’h contemplated giving up her place at business school in the very first term. The problem was not the course, which she enjoyed, but the isolation and occasional discrimination from students and professors.”

My experience as the only woman in the class of 1970 at the Graduate School of Economics at University of Wisconsin, Madison was quite similar—although it was the preceding year in the graduate school English Department that really set the stage for my alienation from academia.

This was in spite of my deep love for learning, the UW campus, its students, libraries, lakes, and the city of Madison. Continue reading →

Are Fears About an ETF Bubble Warranted?

We have a problem in this country. We aren’t suffering like the rest of the world. At least that seems to be the way the rest of the world views us…

They are waiting for us to slide into the same kind of doldrums they’re experiencing.

A number of financial commentators are talking about the coming stock market crisis in the U.S. Gillian Tett, the editor of the U.S. edition of the Financial Times for example, says “The next crash is hiding in plain sight”. Continue reading →

Of SUVs and SIVs

Sent out by newsletter October 30, 2008

It’s great to see the price of gas at $2.45! When was the last time we saw that? And it looks like we are finally beginning to pull out of the freeze on short term borrowing (short term meaning a day to 3 months) between banks. Ever wonder why bank to bank borrowing froze up in the first place? Why money market funds that traded “commercial paper” became so shaky they had to be bailed out by the government’s guarantee that their holdings of a dollar would return you a dollar?

The fancy term for what happened is “flight to quality.” What that means is smart investors (like money market funds) didn’t want to buy commercial debt because they realized those were risky, bad investments. They fled in droves from the banks and financial institutions who were selling them. Commercial paper became so worthless banks wouldn’t even buy it from each other. How on earth did that happen?

Because banks and financial institutions created trusts called “structured investment vehicles” (SIVs) by tossing together the loans and complex debt of lots of different companies. These “vehicles” then sold “commercial paper” to investors who had little idea what was behind the paper, but trusted their banks.

In addition, SIV investments were highly rated. Standard and Poor’s once said in a remark that’s come back to haunt it, that it would rate a deal “structured by cows.” SIV assets were what backed commercial paper. As subprime borrowers and other borrowers began defaulting, smart investors realized their danger. SIV assets were likely to be far less than they cost.

In the beginning SIVs were a terrific deal for banks because the commercial paper being sold just “passed through” the banks. The banks never owned the SIVs. That means banks didn’t have to report them on their books. SIVs were invisible—until they failed! Continue reading →